10 Best Places to Visit in Majorca / Mallorca

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Sitting in the Mediterranean surrounded by glistening blue waters and beaches, Majorca (also known as Mallorca) is a little slice of paradise. This Spanish island will also treat you to some exquisite wine, delectable food, and intriguing culture that will enrapture you from the word go. If this is your first visit to the island, you are probably wondering what to do in Mallorca?! That’s why we have compiled a list of the best places to visit in Majorca so you can maximize your vacation on this incredible island!

Best Time to Visit Majorca

Most people head to Majorca for the beaches. And because beaches are a whole lot less fun without sunshine, you’ll want to aim to hit Majorca during the warmest and driest months of the year. On the island that means from early July through September. By the end of September the island starts to see a decent amount of rainfall which will continue for about three months. Needless to say a wet day at the beach isn’t ideal, so don’t plan your vacation during a time when it could get rained out.

Alternative to mid-summer is springtime. May and June have decently warm weather, though you may still see days dipping into the 60’s or even the low 50’s. For people who want to experience life like a local and aren’t into sunbathing and swimming, this can be a good time to hit Majorca because it won’t be as crowded as it is in the summer months.

Check flights to Majorca from the USA (from $338) and UK (from £27)

Map of Majorca

Below is map with all of the best places to visit in Majorca, so you can familiarize yourself with the island. For more detailed hiking, cycling, or city maps visit the official tourism office website here.

How to Get Around Majorca

Majorca is a well-connected island, but certain places can be difficult to reach without your own transportation. A car rental is a good idea if you’re looking to visit places farther north. Some destinations can also be reached by bus, but if you’re trying to get anywhere too remote you won’t have luck this way; plus service can be limited, which could potentially leave you stranded for longer than you want. To get the best rate on your rental car, we recommend you check out Rentalcars.com.

If you’ll just be sticking to Palma then you can easily get around by taxi, foot, or bicycle. There is also a singular metro line in the city and a bus (the number 1) which connects Palma to the airport.

Where to Stay in Majorca

If you are visiting Majorca during the high season make sure to book your accommodation well in advance. That way you have greater selection of hotels and hostels to choose from and don’t end up paying a premium because you’ve waited until last minute.

With that being said, Majorca offers accommodation for all types of travelers. Budget backpacker should check out Hostelworld for the best rates on dorm rooms. Booking.com usually offers the best rates on hotels and guesthouses. And if you are looking for an all-inclusive hotel in Majorca, Iberostar has plenty of highly rated resorts around the island.

So you don’t have to search through millions of hotel listings, we also listed our recommended accommodation options for each place below.

Best Places to Visit in Majorca

Majorca isn’t a huge island. In fact, it takes only about an hour and a half to drive from one end to the other, but it’s packed full and you’ll find more than enough fun things to do in Majorca to keep you busy on your holiday.

The gothic Cathedral La Seu at Palma de Mallorca islands, Spain
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1. Palma de Mallorca

Palma de Mallorca, known casually as Palma, is the capital city of the island and one of the most popular tourist destinations in Mallorca. The only airport servicing Majorca is less than eight miles from town, so this is generally the first stop most tourists make.

Palma is lively with culture, food, music, and drinks, but it also has a castle, a beach, a cathedral, and a picturesque old town. While you may want to save your beach visits for other parts of the island, the stretch of sand in Palma is nearly a mile long and is easily walkable from downtown. Alternative to sunbathing, check out the Palau de l’Almudaina. This cavernous building is officially a royal residence of the Spanish royal family, but when they are not in town it is open to the public. With a history that includes a period as an Islamic Fort, this building is more than just a pretty face.

Historic Tram of the Soller Tramway line driving in a street in Soller, Mallorca, Spain
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2. Sóller

The tenth largest city in Majorca as far as population, Sóller sits a few kilometers inland in the north west of the island. Sóller is surrounded by mountains and sits down in a valley. These mountains make for great hiking or walking, and there are trails all throughout the Tramuntana mountains. You can head from the city down to the beach, or you can go farther up into the mountains and visit the nearby village of Fornalutx. If you’d rather stick to the beaches, Cala Tuent is a lovely spot nearby. The harbor of Sóller, Port de Sóller, has a cosmopolitan feel and boasts sand beaches, a beachfront promenade, and plenty of cafes. There’s a tram which takes you directly from Sóller down to the port.

Beautiful view of Platja d'Alcudia with palm trees, sand beach Majorca, Spain
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3. Alcúdia

Sitting on its own little peninsula in the north of the island, the city of Alcúdia has housed people since the Bronze Age. While it’s full of history, the story really starts to be told in Roman times. Today you can visit the Museu Monogràfic de Pol·lèntia which displays archaeological finds of Roman relics or walk along the city walls which have been standing since the 16th century. Plus there’s all of old town to see as well as a church dating back to the 14th century.

Of course there is a point at which all the history becomes too much to digest and it’s time to kick back a little. Luckily, with Alcúdia strategically wedged between two coastlines, beaches abound. If you’re looking for something a bit more bustling with plenty of options for activities, check out Playa de Alcúdia. If you’d rather chill out, the little protected cove where you’ll find Playa de S’illot is the place to be.

Beautiful view of the small town Valldemossa situated in picturesque mountains on Mallorca island, Spain.
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4. Valldemossa

Idyllic, pretty, picturesque, quaint… All the most cliché words you can think of to describe a village nestled into Majorca’s green mountains perfectly describe Valldemossa. You’re on an island so the beaches are never far away, but everyone can use a visit to the mountains once in a while. There’s an Arab history here followed by that of Franciscan monks. As such, you’ll find a monastery open to the public, most famous for its connections with Chopin. There’s also a small old town and some gardens worth visiting. However what’s really worthwhile while you’re already up this high is to do some hiking. Nearby summits will provide stunning panoramic views of the Mediterranean and the rest of the island.

Cala Esmeralda beach, Cala d'Or city, Palma Mallorca, Spain
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5. Cala d’Or

Cala d’Or is a small village in southern Mallorca that has blossomed into a busy resort town. There are a multitude of sandy beaches speckled along the coastline of this lovely town. Many of the beaches are in protected coves, making them great for families with younger children or less capable swimmers. Considered by many to be one of the best towns in Mallorca, every vacationer can find something to suit their interests there. Whether you want to spend a week sipping cocktails in a sun lounger or sailing out at sea, Cala d’Or can hook you up.

Lighthouse of Cap de Formentor in Mallorca, Spain
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6. Cap de Formentor

If you’re looking for epic scenery, Cap de Formentor is the place to find it. This peninsula is the northernmost on the island of Majorca, and the drive to get there is as spectacular as the destination itself. Stop at Mirador del Mal Pas on your way to the tip of the peninsula. There is plenty to see and photograph along the coastline and throughout the mountains, and if you’re looking for a very relaxed, away-from-it-all stay, this is the place to be. But it can also be combined quite nicely as a day trip from the nearby Alcúdia.

Idyllic view of the beautiful beach of Cala Deia, Majorca island, Spain
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7. Deià

Deià has always drawn in the eccentric, artistic types. As an artists’ colony, there is history throughout the early and mid 20th century of this mountain village. Today the genre of residents has shifted slightly to the wealthier types, but that feel of something different remains. Thanks in part to its past, this little town hosts an annual international music festival focused mostly on classical artists. Throughout the rest of the year there are the basic island activities like hiking, cycling, and beachgoing. Here in Deià be sure to check out the home of Robert Graves, an English poet and novelist who was one of the first artists to make Deià their home.

Pollenca/Pollensa in Mallorca, Spain
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8. Pollença / Pollensa

On the road between Alcúdia and Cap de Formentor you’ll find Pollença. The great thing about this little town is that it is home to locals. The glitz and glamour of touristy resorts and high-rolling seasonal residents is left behind, making this a haven for anyone looking for something a bit quieter. Since it’s a bit inland from the coast, beaches aren’t the main attraction here. Instead, spend your time wine tasting at Ca’n Vidalet Vineyard just outside of town. You can also spend your time shopping at the local boutiques, dining at the quality restaurants, or golfing at either of the two golf courses nearby.

Idyllic panorama view of old village Fornalutx with beautiful mountain landscape of Sierra de Tramuntana on Mallorca, Spain
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9. Fornalutx

A 45-minute walk from Sóller, Fornalutx can be reached easily by foot along a marked path. The main focus in town is the Plaça d’Espanya which is watched over from above by the church. Most of this little town is made of stone and many buildings are uniquely decorated with red roofs and green shutters. It may just be one of the prettiest towns in Majorca, and you’ll absolutely love spending a day here wandering through it.

Beautiful coast and harbour of Cala Figuera in Mallorca, Spain
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10. Cala Figuera

Cala Figuera is one of the most working class areas of the island. Acting now and historically as a fishing port, this is where you want to come for fresh seafood, among other things. The harbor is a fun place to hang out and watch the action, but this isn’t the place to be if you want to swim. However, if diving is something that interests you, Cala Figuera has a diving school that can get you into the depths of the beautiful, clear blue Mediterranean waters.

Majorca is a wonderful spot for just about everyone. Whether it’s sun, sea, food, or wine you seek, you can find it here among the beautiful mountains and magnificent beaches of this Spanish island.